LIONEL TRILLING FREUD AND LITERATURE PDF

A revised version appeared in Horizon , September The Freudian psychology is the only systematic account of the human mind whch, in point of subtlety and complexity, of interest and tragic power, deserves to stand beside the chaotic mass of psychological insights which literature has accumulated through the centuries. To pass from the reading of a great literary work to a treatise of academic psychology is to pass from one order of perception to another, but the human nature of the Freudian psychology is exactly the stuff upon which the poet has always exercised his art. It is therefore not surprising that the psycho-analytical theory has had a great effect upon literature.

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Trilling , Lionel. This is why psychoanalysis has had a great impact on the study of literature. Of course, the. He traces it in particular to a widely admired text, which Freud. However, Freud. Trilling then asks what is the difference between the dream and neurosis, on the one. Freud does admit that there is.

However, Freud does believe that it accomplishes two things:. The biggest hindrance is the absence of the. Trilling then turns his attention to the view that an artwork reveals much about the. Jones credits, on the basis of only.

Trilling hastens to add that it is not his intention to dismiss a psychoanalytic reading. Rather, he is of the view that he best practitioners of psychoanalytic criticism are. What then, Trilling wonders, does Freud contribute to our understanding of art?

The value of. In addition to this, Trilling writes, there are two other elements have great bearing on art and. However, he was forced to reconsider this view. This was also. To solve these problems, Freud posits. There are implications of this for our understanding of tragedy. The pleasure involved therein. However, there. Richard L. London: Martin Secker and Warburg, To pass from the reading of a great literary work to a treatise of academic psychology is to pass from one order of perception to another, but the human nature of the Freudian psychology is exactly the stuff upon which the poet has always exercised his art.

Again and again we see the effective, utilitarian ego being relegated to an inferior position and a plea being made on behalf of the anarchic and self-indulgent id. We find the energetic exploitation fo the idea of the mind as a divisible thing, one part of which can contemplate and mock the other.

The aim of psychoanalysis, he says, is the control of the night side of life. If Freud discovered the darkness for science he never endorsed it. On the contrary, his rationalism supports all the ideas of the Enlightenment that deny validity to myth or religion; he holds to a simple materialism, to a simple determinism, to a rather simple sort of epistemology.

No great scientist of our day has thundered so articulately and so fiercely against all those who would siphisticate with metaphysics the scientific principles that were good enough for the nineteenth century. Psychoanalytic practice is about helping patients to cope with the seeming reality of their in fact most often unfounded fears and problems: For Freud there are two ways of dealing with external reality. One is practical, effective, positive; this is the way of the conscious self, of the ego which must be made independent of the super-ego and extend its organisation over the id, and it is the right way.

The antithetical way may be called. Instead of doing something about, or to, external reality, the individual who uses this way does something to, or about, his affective states. And in ways yet more complicated and yet more unpleasant, the actual neurosis from which our patient suffers deals with an external reality which the mind considers still more unpleasant than the painful neurosis itself.

Trilling then asks what is the difference between the dream and neurosis, on the one hand, and art on the other. Unconscious processes are at work in both, they share the element of fantasy. It must also lie in its effect. In short, the audience partly determines the meaning of the work. Trilling then turns his attention to the view that an artwork reveals much about the mind of the artist which in turn sheds light on the artwork.

Far from it. IV What then, Trilling wonders, does Freud contribute to our understanding of art? Moreover, Freud shows how the mind, in one of its parts, could work without logic, yet not without that directing purpose, that control of intent from which. The unconscious mind in its struggle with the conscious always turns from the general to the concrete and finds the tangible trifle more congenial than the large abstraction.

Freud discovered in the very organisation of the mind those mechanisms by which art makes its effects, such devices as the condensations of meanings and the displacement of accent. That is, the dream is the effort to reconstruct the bad situation in order that the failure to meet it may be recouped; in these dreams there is no obscured intent to evade but only an attempt to meet the situation, to make a new effort of control.

For Freud, man is not to be conceived by any simple formula such as sex but is rather an inextricable tangle of culture and biology. And not being simple, he is not simply good; he has. Short-link Link Embed. Share from cover. Share from page:. More magazines by this user. Close Flag as Inappropriate. You have already flagged this document. Thank you, for helping us keep this platform clean. The editors will have a look at it as soon as possible. Delete template? Cancel Delete.

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Freud and Literature

Lionel Trilling. Trilling was an American literary critic and teacher who brought psychological, sociological, and philosophical methods and insights into criticism. His critical writings include studies of Matthew Arnold and E. Trilling maintained an interest in Freud and psychoanalysis throughout his career. However he never based his criticism on any one system of thought. He always remained loyal, like E. Forster, to the tradition of humanistic thought.

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1 LIONEL TRILLING "FREUD AND LITERATURE" (1940) Trilling ...

Freud and Literature by Lionel Trilling. October 04, In Lionel Trilling in his "Freud and Literature"remarked that " of all mental systems the Freudian psychology is the one which makes poetry indigenous to the very constitution of the mind". The Psychoanalytical theory of Freud has had a great effect upon literature. Yet the relationship is reciprocal, and the effect of Freud upon literature has been no greater than the effect of literature on Freud.

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