FOOTFALLS SAMUEL BECKETT PDF

As this term paper is mainly about the psychoanalysis, it is necessary to ask, how much Beckett knew about this explicit field of psychology. Bion [ The notes he made about psychoanalytical theories, when he was in therapy, had been discovered after his death, so it is very likely that he used some of them for his later plays. James D. Jung in London. The story of a woman who seemed to be so insane, that Jung failed in any attempt to cure her.

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As this term paper is mainly about the psychoanalysis, it is necessary to ask, how much Beckett knew about this explicit field of psychology. Bion [ The notes he made about psychoanalytical theories, when he was in therapy, had been discovered after his death, so it is very likely that he used some of them for his later plays.

James D. Jung in London. The story of a woman who seemed to be so insane, that Jung failed in any attempt to cure her. Therefore, further explanations shall be pointed out in this chapter. Cases like the one of Bertha Pappenheim, rather known as Anna O. Freud and Breuer pointed out, that most of the hysterical symptoms had its origin from a trauma, which the patient got in contact with.

Different to his colleague, Freud was of the opinion that hysteria can always be tracked back to sexual experiences in childhood or in the early adolescence. Furthermore, Freud argued that a trauma may not be associated with a severe physical injury, e. Some of them may consist [ For this reason, the descriptions of the dissociative identity disorder, the dissociative amnesia, the disorder with dissociative trance and obsession are of particular interest for our analyses.

The dissociative identity disorder, also known as multiple personality disorder, can be one characteristic of hysterical patients. DID patients have at least one other personality, of which they are not conscious of. The personality which is being suppressed by the others is often of a depressive nature, anxious, obsessive about being a good person and suffers amnesia. Of course, the audience does not see how May is doing all those things as the only action May does is pacing up and down the stage.

The story we hear is told in a third person narrative. One of the major characteristics of the dissociative amnesia is the incapability to remember important facts, way more serious than a distinctive forgetfulness.

This inability is not due to a damage of the brain, as only memories of personal and those of psychological relevance are affected by it. Awakening after such a possession, he or she does often not know how it got to the unfamiliar surroundings in the first place. Also May paces up and down, controlled either by her mother, who is counting her steps now and then. As already pointed out on the previous pages it is mainly due to a traumatic event that a person reacts hysterically in the historical sense of the disease.

The play itself gives no clue, when this trauma overcame her senses. However, Beckett tells where it began:. Why in the old home, the same where she- [Pause.

Considering Freud again, every hysteria has its origin in a prematurely sexual experience, which the patient had not been able to cope with. Whether Beckett supported this idea of Freud and therefore combined a possible relationship between May or Amy and a men who introduced her into the world of sexuality one does not know, a supporting line in the play for this cannot be found.

As already mentioned earlier, the only person we can see or read about on stage is May. Even in the memories May and her mother are recalling, there is only evidence of a few other female characters, Mrs Winter, Amy and a few other girls of her age. One explanation however may be the fact, that in past times only women were said to suffer under the phenomenon of hysteria.

Freud and Charcot were the first scholars who proved that also men could be affected by this disorder. The similarities are astounding. Hull, 2nd ed. London: Roudledge and Kegan Paul, - 79 96, qtd. Hysterie und Angst Frankfurt am Main: S.

Fischer, Dercum, Hysteria and accident compensation : nature of hysteria and the lesson of the post-litigation results Philadelphia: The Geo. Bisel, Herzog and S. Engelmann and H. Add to cart. Table of contents 1. Conclusion 5. Bibliography 1. The dissociative amnesia One of the major characteristics of the dissociative amnesia is the incapability to remember important facts, way more serious than a distinctive forgetfulness.

V: In your forties. M: So little? I saw nothing, heard nothing, of any kind. I was not there. Mrs W: Not there? Amy: Not there. Mrs W: But I heard you respond.

Moorjani Freud, Hysterie und Angst Sign in to write a comment. Read the ebook. Theaterwissenschaft, Tanz Selbstreflexion des Theaters in Samue Anglistik - Literatur Reduktionsformen der Sprache und Komm Germanistik - Komparatistik, Vergleichende Literaturwissenschaft J.

Coetzees "Warten auf die B The Life of a Literar Anglistik - Literatur Comparing Absurdist Plays. Samuel Bec Publish now - it's free. We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience.

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Not I, Footfalls, Rockaby review – a technical masterclass in Beckett

Footfalls is a play by Samuel Beckett. Billie Whitelaw , for whom the piece had been written, played May whilst Rose Hill voiced the mother. The play is in four parts. Each opens with the sound of a bell. After this the lights fade up to reveal an illuminated strip along which a woman, May, paces back and forth, nine steps within a one-metre stretch. In each part, the light will be somewhat darker than in the preceding one. Therefore, it is darkest when the strip is lit up without May at the very end.

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Towards a psychoanalytical interpretation of "Footfalls" (Samuel Beckett)

Although I had seen fine productions of Waiting for Godot, Happy Days, and Endgame, I was not prepared for the brilliant technical presentation of That Time, nor for the emotional impact ofFootfalls with the gray intensity of Billie Whitelaw, for whom the play was written. The measured but iron pacing of Beckett's own direction helped to create a dramatic experience beyond any I had previously known in the theater. This strange, obsessive play of a woman pacing a gray path of light, talking with her mother, explaining her life through story and fitful movement, and then finally disappearing, created heart-stopping pity in me, and an inexplicable terror. I felt and continue to feel that Beckett has created a distilled but potent tragedy in Footfalls that is equal in resonance and power to Godot orEndgame. In this essay I would like to explain what seem to me the sources ofpower in this play and to claim for it a significant place in Beckett's career. Footfalls shows us May, a middle-aged woman dressed in gray, pacing up and down a path of light three feet wide and nine paces long. I We see and hear this woman in dialogue with the voice of her unseen mother, and we see her during monologues ofboth the mother and herself.

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