FEMTOCELL ALCATEL PDF

In telecommunications , a femtocell is a small, low-power cellular base station , typically designed for use in a home or small business. A broader term which is more widespread in the industry is small cell , with femtocell as a subset. It is also called femto AccessPoint AP. It connects to the service provider's network via broadband such as DSL or cable ; current designs typically support four to eight simultaneously active mobile phones in a residential setting depending on version number and femtocell hardware, and eight to sixteen mobile phones in enterprise settings.

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While most cell towers are outside, most mobile phone calls today are made inside buildings. This leads to two problems: coverage and capacity. Wireless signals can have difficulty penetrating building exteriors, especially large office towers, which are made of steel, concrete and often utilize energy-saving windows. Even if there is only one wireless user in the building, they might not be able to make a call due to lack of signal coverage.

But of course, there usually isn't just one person in a building; there may be hundreds or even thousands. Even if there is some wireless coverage within the building from the outside cell towers, it often won't provide enough capacity for everyone in the building.

One way to address in-building wireless coverage is by using cell phone repeaters. But repeaters don't address capacity issues; they simply take the wireless signal available outside the building and make it available indoors. Once the number of occupants in a building exceeds a certain number, additional capacity is needed to accommodate them. Since the BTS is supplied by the wireless service provider and requires that they run their own leased fiber to the building, this solution is very expensive.

A less expensive way and much quicker to add additional in-building capacity is by using small cells. Small cells are exactly what you likely think they are: small cellular base stations designed specifically to add additional capacity over small coverage areas. They're often used outdoors to add capacity in high-density areas where a lot of people congregate, such as stadiums and amphitheaters.

Small cells are also perfectly suited for use in buildings because they solve both the coverage and capacity issues, and can be deployed quickly and are inexpensively. Small cells fall into one of three general categories that are dictated by their power level: metrocells , picocells and femtocells. General performance measures for each category are shown in the table below. Regardless of the type chosen, for a wireless connection to be established the small cell needs to be connected to the cellular provider's network.

This is known as backhaul. For outdoor cell towers, this usually involves fiber optic or microwave backhaul. Since neither of those are available in buildings, small cells connect to the cellular provider's network via what carriers call "untrusted backhaul," or what you refer to as simply "the Internet.

That means that a high speed Internet connection is a requirement for any kind of picocell or femtocell deployment. The minimum required bandwidth depends on the type and number of small cells deployed. Because today's cellular phones use digital modulation, their signals need to be generated with a high degree of timing precision. Since the beginning of digital cellular technology, the accurate, external timing source used has been GPS Global Positioning System.

The GPS signal used for the small cells is the same satellite-based signal used to determine your location and give you driving directions in Google Maps. While GPS is not perfect, it is readily available and relatively inexpensive to implement. GPS signals are most readily available outdoors, which make using them for large cell towers very convenient.

However, even when cell coverage moves indoors with small cells, they still need an accurate, external timing source. Small cells on the market today either have a built-in GPS antenna which means they need to be placed near a window to get GPS signal , or include an external GPS antenna that needs to be positioned so that it's near a window or outdoors. Read more about why and possible alternative solutions here.

Since the GPS antenna port can be very useful, we recommend finding an older, white model to purchase rather than buying the newer DPH model.

Recommendation: This product line has been discontinued. A maximum of 3 Metrocells can be provisioned in a single building. Each individual unit will cover up to 30, square feet, but an unlimited number of devices can be installed within a building to provide coverage over a much larger area. Recommendation: A great solution as long as you are happy with LTE only signal. The device only supports only 4G LTE service. That means that anyone who has an older phone that doesn't support "HD Voice" won't be able to connect to the device.

Unfortunately there is no way to limit who can access the device, so if you live in an apartment and there are other users within range of the device, they can connect and use the extender's signal. If you need more than just LTE signal or have more users, you may want to consider a Verizon signal booster instead. The device will cover up to 3, square feet, and includes an external GPS antenna port.

So if you walk into your home or office while on a call, the call will be dropped instead of handing off to the device. However, the device will attempt to hand off calls to the macro network as you walk out of the building. The device repeates signal on the 2. Since Sprint has not yet rolled out Voice over LTE, the device does not currently support voice calls.

Recommendation: Lack of support for voice calls means that the unit is useful if you require LTE signal only, and not voice calls. Consider a Sprint signal booster instead.

Recommendation: The lack of hand-off to the macro cellular network can be very frustrating for users, and it appears that Sprint is in the process of discontinuining this device. New: We just rebranded from RepeaterStore to Waveform.

Read why. Talk to a signal expert: Email. Toggle navigation Formerly RepeaterStore. What is a "small cell," and why are they needed? Types of small cells Small cells fall into one of three general categories that are dictated by their power level: metrocells , picocells and femtocells. A Key Prerequisite: Internet connectivity Regardless of the type chosen, for a wireless connection to be established the small cell needs to be connected to the cellular provider's network.

The Need for In-Building GPS Because today's cellular phones use digital modulation, their signals need to be generated with a high degree of timing precision. Available Models. Provider Manufacturer Name Part No. Cisco DPH [Discontinued]. Alcatel Lucent Buy it at Waveform.

Up to 7, sq. Up to 7 simultaneous voice calls. Up to 2, sq. Hands off to macro network, but not from macro network. Up to 5 units can be linked to gether to cover up to 37, sq. Sprint Magicbox. Sprint Airave 2. Sprint Airave [Discontinued]. Alcatel Lucent.

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Femtocells

While most cell towers are outside, most mobile phone calls today are made inside buildings. This leads to two problems: coverage and capacity. Wireless signals can have difficulty penetrating building exteriors, especially large office towers, which are made of steel, concrete and often utilize energy-saving windows. Even if there is only one wireless user in the building, they might not be able to make a call due to lack of signal coverage.

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